With great dread and trepidation, I started working part-time this week. Even though I was cleared to only work 4-6 hours per week, I’ve been working 7-hour a day, which are short compared to my pre-accident 10-11 hour days.
 
I’d been counseled by a nurse, assigned to me by my health insurance company, to push back and not over-extend myself, but it’s difficult to say "no" when I’m the sole person doing messaging and marcom for "D" Worldwide Consumer Services. It’s become obviously that no one "picked up the ball" in my absence.
 
Meanwhile, my broken pelvis, sacrum and ribs are giving me little grieve and I’m finally able to lie for a few minutes on my right side. Progress!
 
Just as my leg pain was easing, my stomach, intestines and everything in-between decided to go on strike. I’m going on day ten of eating small portions of bland food. When I initially got sick, I stopped taking my pain pills. Half of me believe that some of my digestive distress is related to withdrawing from opiates. I’ve always been sensitive to medications. Grumble.
 
Even though I’d been fantasizing about starting to walk in late March, my orthopedic surgeon won’t be taking x-rays until mid-April. At that time, he can determine how well the bones have healed and when I can start putting weight on my left leg. In preparation, I start therapy in a warm pool this week. I’m very excited to be able to swim and awaken muscles that have been dormant asleep for six weeks.
 
A few days ago, I realized that I could park my wheelchair next to the staircase, carefully sit on the first step and pull myself up step-by-step. Once upstairs, I can slid on my rump into the bedroom then use the furniture to hoist myself up onto one leg. From there, I can climb into our bed and cuddle with Rich. It is bliss to have him comfort me when I wake up at odd hours or have a nightmare, which happen way too often.
 
Along with my digestive challenges, I can only sleep for a few hours at a time. After I’m awake, it takes hours to fall back to sleep. I despair of ever being normal again!
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